Do-you-drink-enough-water

Do you drink enough water?

We all know water is good for us but do you know why? Water is our body’s main component, making up on average 60% of our body’s weight, hence every system in our body is dependent on water. If we don’t drink enough it can lead to dehydration and even mild dehydration can drain our energy, make us feel tired and hinder weight loss.

Benefits of water:

  • Protects organs and tissues by flushing out toxins
  • Carries nutrients and oxygen to our cells
  • Regulates our body temperature
  • Helps to prevent constipation
  • Provides moisture for our ear, nose and throat tissues
  • Lubricates our joints
  • Lessens the burden on our kidneys and liver by flushing out waste

On a normal day our bodies lose approximately 2 ½ litres of water through breathing, sweating and other bodily functions. On a very hot day or when we’re exercising we lose even more.

In order for our bodies to work properly we must replenish this lost water supply by consuming beverages and foods that contain water. Food usually accounts for 20% of our total fluid intake, so if we consume 2 litres of water or beverages such as low calorie squash, coffee, tea including green teas, fruit teas or rooibos/redbush tea each day (a little more than 8 cups) along with our normal diet, we will typically replace these lost fluids.

If you are feeling thirsty, listen to your body. It is telling you that you need to be having a drink. Another good guide is to look at your urine. It should be either colourless or of a pale yellow shade and there should be plenty of it. If it is dark in colour, has a strong odour or there’s not a lot of it, then you really need to start drinking more. If your weight loss isn’t as good as you feel it should be, then it could well be worth increasing your fluid intake if you know you don’t drink enough.

In my personal experience I know that the weeks where I am drinking adequate amounts of water, they are the weeks where I achieve good weight loss.

This article was contributes by Jo Butcher, owner of Jo’s Fit4All Classes.

Copyright findmy.fitness 2015. All rights reserved.

Best-Exercise

Which exercise might suit you?

There’s no doubt that keeping active makes us feel more energetic. But there are other more specific benefits, including helping to:

  • manage high blood pressure and angina
  • keep you at a healthy weight
  • maintain regular bowel movements
  • stimulate a poor appetite
  • strengthen muscles and bones, reducing the risk of falls and fractures
  • ease discomfort if you have arthritis or Parkinson’s

Regular exercise also boosts the brain chemicals that lift your mood and make you feel happy – so it can be a good way to deal with stress and anxiety.

The 4 building blocks to being active

Developing and maintaining stamina, strength, flexibility and balance are particularly important as you get older, and can help you carry out everyday tasks more easily, as well as enjoy activities more.

Stamina helps you to walk longer distances, swim and mow the lawn.

Strength helps you to climb stairs, carry shopping, rise from a chair and open a container.

Flexibility helps you to bend, get in and out of a car, wash your hair and get dressed.

Balance helps you to walk and climb steps confidently, stand from a sitting position and respond quickly if you trip.

Different activities bring a different range of benefits, so try a variety of things. Finding something you enjoy means you’re more likely to do it regularly.

Exercise Table

You don’t have to be moving around to benefit from exercise. Chair-based exercises, which you can do sitting or holding on to the back of a chair, are ideal for improving muscle strength and flexibility. You can watch videos online that demonstrate chair-based exercises.

If you’re physically able, but find yourself sitting in front of the computer or television for hours at a time, try to break it up and build activity into your day.
Why not go for a short, brisk walk around the garden or in the street after writing an email or finishing another task where you’ve been sitting still.

However, if you have a health condition that makes moving about difficult or painful, such as Parkinson’s, arthritis or osteoporosis, always consult your GP for help in choosing the right exercise for you.

They may be able to suggest suitable activities and may know of special exercises or classes for people with these health conditions.

This article was kindly supplied by Ali Cannon, owner of The Active Weigh based in Bracknell.

© Copyright 2015 Find My Fitness.

Menopause

Will hot flushes, mood swings and other symptoms of menopause halt when my periods are finally finished?

A question I am asked regularly.

Though you may have some idea of what’s in store for you as you head toward menopause, the stage of life when the ovaries stop producing eggs and menstrual cycles dwindle, you may not quite know what to expect when your periods are officially over.

A woman is medically defined as being in menopause when she has not had a menstrual cycle for at least 12 months.  At that point, the transition into your non-child-bearing years is complete.

After Your Period Stops

Unfortunately the permanent end of menstrual periods doesn’t necessarily mean the end of bothersome menopause symptoms. The symptoms typically associated with menopause, like hot flushes and mood swings, can occur for some time both before and after that point.

Women who have reached menopause can expect menopause symptoms to become worse than they were during perimenopause (the period shortly before menopause). Experts don’t know exactly why this happens, but it’s believed to be related to the hypothalamus, the portion of the brain that regulates temperature.

The hypothalamus is acutely responsive to oestrogen. Leading up to menopause your oestrogen levels fluctuate. When they’re high, you don’t have symptoms. But when you go into menopause and there’s a complete lack of oestrogen, you start to notice those symptoms more.

Managing Menopause Symptoms

Replacing the missing oestrogen in the body with medication can help relieve hot flushes and night sweats.

The simplest way to take control of your physical symptoms is to stay in good health such as taking regular exercise, developing healthy eating habits and getting enough sleep at night. All can help a woman stay stronger, which makes her more able to withstand the changes that occur as oestrogen levels drop. Women who do these things are less likely to be bothered by hot flushes, and they get less of them.

The Most Important Part of Post-Menopause Life

Along with the physical changes that occur after menopause, women may need to improve their health-care routines.

Postmenopausal women are at greater risk of heart disease, so it’s important to redirect your diet toward healthy-fat foods and lower your salt intake — this will reduce your risk of illness. As part of your routine check-ups, you should have a blood test at a minimum of every five years until age 50, and then at regular intervals. Your doctor will recommend what that interval should be based on how high your cholesterol is, if you are on cholesterol treatment, and on other cardiovascular risk factors that you may have, such as hypertension or obesity.
Women should also have their bone density checked once every two years to spot early signs of osteoporosis, a weakening of the bones. Postmenopausal women are particularly at risk for this condition: Research shows that up to 20 percent of bone loss can occur in the first five years of menopause. Oestrogen is one of the best stimulators of bone growth. The risk of osteoporosis is very low before menopause, but post-menopausally fractured hips and problems related to bone density are very likely.

This article was kindly supplied by Susan Booth, owner of Alive Fitness based in Derby.

© Copyright 2015 Find My Fitness.